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Yogi Ramaiah


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#1 Mahavir_

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 08:08 AM

In some of Master's letters to Rajarsi from India, he tells of a fully-liberated saint he met who was a disciple of Ramana Maharshi. Master so enjoyed his company that he told Rajarsi, if he did not have to go back to America for the students and the work, he would have stayed with this yogi. It is the one who Master spoke of as having wild, angry cobras sitting on his head and being perfectly Self-realized. Later, after Master's mahasamadhi, and he having told people about him in America, it is said Daya Mata corresponded with Yogi Ramaiah a number of times. Here is an interesting article about this great Yogi Ramaiah, and how he came to the feet of his guru Ramana Maharshi.

yogi-ramaiah-bvn-bhagavan.jpg

Yogi Ramiah sitting on the ground at Bhagavan's feet, B. V. Narasimha Swami behind him, with pencil and paper. Circa 1929



http://www.arunachal...l-aug#article.1


B. V. Narasimha Swami was the first English biographer of Sri Ramana Maharshi. He asked many devotees and disciples to write about their lives and experiences with the Master. Yogi Ramiah submitted a 2000 word essay, from which B.V.N. extracted a short edited account to print in his book, titled Self-Realization.

The following is B. V. Narasimha Swami's edited account published in Self Realization, followed by the full autobiographical essay written by the Yogi himself. All this text has been printed in Arunachala's Ramana, Boundless Ocean of Grace, Book II, published by Sri Ramanasramam and available at the Ashram Bookstall in Tiruvannamalai.


Yogi Ramiah belongs to the community of Reddiars and was a wealthy land proprietor of Annareddipalayam, near Buchi Reddipalayam, Nellore District. He received hardly any education. Being the sole owner of his properties he had every inducement to pass his days merrily with his thoughtless companions, boys of his own age. But at about the age of eighteen his thoughts took a serious turn and he gave up his former associates and took an interest in religion.

A Brahmin Guru imparted to him the Rama Taraka Mantram and asked him to repeat it five thousand times daily. "If the number is exceeded, what then?" asked the ardent youth.

"So much the better," was the Guru's reply.

"If I repeat it always?" was the next query. The Guru was delighted at the keenness of the disciple's enthusiasm and expressed warm approval.

Ramiah went on with his japam from morning till night, whatever he might be doing. He also began to practice pranayanam, breath control. Consequently, vairagya, or disgust with his worldly surroundings, grew so strong in his breast that he suddenly left home to go north to perform tapas in holy places like Kasi, etc.

On the way, he met his Guru who asked him if he had obtained his mother's permission for the pilgrimage. When he admitted that there was no intimation or permission, the Guru sent him back to Annareddipalayam, telling him to "Go and do your tapas in the seclusion of your garden and later on I shall come and see how you have progressed." Ramiah returned home and went on with his tapas. He developed both breath control and meditation without any one to help him. He was able to remain several hours in a blissful mood, beholding the tip of his nose, i.e, breath being easily regulated and stilled. His mind was equally stilled and happy. Perfect continence, sattvic food, just barely enough to keep the body and mind working, and intense devotion through his japa to God (Rama) carried him soon to illumination in samadhi. He noted with surprise how God Rama as an external being vanished and gave place to the feeling of God in the Self. Again he noted that though at the outset he retained the distinction between himself (the subject) and the objects he perceived or thought of, the distinction was dissolved as soon as he was lost in Samadhi, when he experienced no real difference between subject and object. "Could the two be after all identical?" was the thought that occurred to him. As it was a novel and puzzling experience, he did not feel sure of his conclusions and asked local pundits about it. Their replies did not satisfy him. So he came to Tiruvannamalai in 1925 and in Maharshi's presence asked Kavyakantha Ganapathi Sastri about it. "The subject is of course different from the object," was the Sastri's reply. Ramiah was disappointed and looked up to the Maharshi, who at once supplemented or corrected the Sastri's reply: "Subject and object are distinct in the phenomenal world to the ordinary man, but in samadhi they merge and become one." Ramiah was very glad to note this corroboration from this eminent Swami. Thence forward he took Maharshi as his sole guide.

For many years he still continued with his life of yoga, with mounam (silence) and tapas, as its support. He ate little, controlled his breath and stayed many hours at a stretch in blissful ecstasy, mostly in the cottage of his own garden. He would also stay for a few months each year with Maharshi at Ramanasramam. He loved and was loved by the Maharshi. As Yogi Ramiah did not know Tamil, the Maharshi translated his Tamil poems .Upadesa Saram. and .Ulladu Narpadu. into Telugu. In appreciation, Yogi Ramiah helped in repairing Palithirtam, in the construction of Asramam hall and the Asramam well.



The original manuscript, wherein Yogi Ramiah tells in his own words about his life and experiences:


From my boyhood I had great devotion (bhakti) towards Sri Rama Namam. Till I was nineteen years old I was generally of a rajasic temperament and was fearless. I used to listen attentively whenever elders recited stories of God or taught dharma; and I used to make friendship with such elders. Once I heard of the life of Kabir from an old gentleman and at once I became sorrowful that I had wasted my life till then. "How to get undistracted devotion (ananya bhakti)?" "How can I become fit for God's mercy (kripa)?" These were my desires. Though I was not a bhakta from childhood like Kabir, I got vairagyam and wanted to do penance (tapas) like Valmiki, until the body is covered with ant hills. I then knew that penance meant meditating on Rama Namam continuously like the constant flow of oil, and to be in samadhi, forgetting this body. Thus I acquired bhakti and vairagyam. Subsequently love for the body (dehabhimanam) disappeared.

Formerly I had many friends, but the feeling of friendship for them left me. I couldn't leave the continuous dhyanam (meditation) even for a minute. I used to feel sorry that the nights were being wasted in sleep. I used to feel that I was meditating even in my sleep. I used to be in meditation when I awoke. I used to get up at 3 o.clock in the morning, bathe and, sitting in a secluded place, would meditate till 8 o.clock. From 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. I would read Bhagavatam. After meals I would listen to Bhagavatam read by a Brahmin. In the evenings, I would go outside the town and meditate sitting alone. Even if such a place be the pathway used by men and cattle, I would neither know of or hear anything during meditation. I used to offer puja, imagining the form of Vishnu in my heart.

When Brahmanantha Thirtha Swami was at Nellore, I went and prayed to him to give me upadesa and teach me yoga so that I could meditate upon Rama and conquer the mind. He then gave me Rama Tarakam Mantram and asked me to meditate on it, observing pranayama, for a little while, at the time. He said that to practice pranayama vigorously, solitary living and food restrictions are necessary.

I was then meditating by focusing my attention towards the middle of the eyes. In a short time, Chitkalas (guiding spirits) began to appear in a variety of ways, but they disappeared after some time. Then a flame like the sun began to appear. This would appear even when meditating with eyes closed, but there would be nothing when opening my eyes. I thought that Surya Bhagavan was appearing. Knowing that the vision was from inside, I began to practice vigorously. After some time the vision assumed a clearer form like the moon. Later on in the place of this moon a jyoti began to appear. While in this condition, the drik (subject) and drisyam (object) would disappear and I would feel that the atma was Poornam, the Perfect survivor. At that time this condition would not last continuously, but would only recur from time to time. I then got extra vairagyam. It was at that time that I left my home.

Without telling anybody I wanted to go to Dandaka Forest and do penance like Valmiki and the rishis. Before traveling north, I got down from the train to meet my Guru at Bapatla, in the Guntur District. As soon as he saw me he asked whether I had left home after informing my people. I told him the truth, that is, that I did not inform anyone. He then told me, "You cannot stay there (Dandaka Forest) and do penance. There are many difficulties there. Have an asramam in your village and do penance there. I will come and see you occasionally. Go back home to your village." Before leaving to return to my home, he gave me upadesam.

When I first got vairagyam I started a water pandal for distribution of water on Narasimha Jayanti days. It is still going on. I started my own asramam and named it Rama Asramam. It has been useful for meditation and also other purposes. Within two years of my spiritual life there was a break in yoga. I felt very sorry for this break and with firm determination, giving up all things, I joined this Rama Asramam in 1922. By constant meditation, sitting on an asana, I used to become fatigued. To get over this fatigue I would immediately do pranyama. While doing this and learning from books, such as Jnana Vasishtam, Bhagavad Gita and Bhagavatam, that yoga should be practiced keeping the lakshyam at the tip of the nose, I began to do likewise. Practicing like this for some time and seeing nothing at the end of the nose I began to feel discouraged. Summoning confidence, however, from my firm belief that what is written in the sastras can never be untrue, I gave up interest in food and sleep and assumed a meditative posture. I was always doing dhyana, dharana and pranayama. Gradually I achieved breath retention. Now and then I used to feel the sushumna, subtle force, rise up. Since then a jyoti began to appear. For some months there was no body sense and the Self was all pervading. Ahamkara disappeared. It was realized that it was not I that was meditating, the I was the witness of the ahamkara, that I really am Atman and that this is my true form. The external vision decreased by constant concentration of the Self.

There was no desire to eat anything. In spite of bodily difficulties the mind was always happy. I was thinking of Rama in saguna aspect and offering puja to Hari in my heart.

As the external vision decreased, I wanted to go to experienced gurus with Brahma Nishta and tell them about my experiences and to find out what their experiences were. By enquiry I found out that there were many who had read books only, without experiencing the Self and I could not find any with Brahma Nishta. In my boyhood when I came on a pilgrimage to Arunagiri I saw Bhagavan. Since then, at times, I used to think of him. Learning that Bhagavan knows Telugu, I went to him, offered my respects, sat in his presence and was looking at him. I found that he was introverted, his eyes were not moving, breath appeared to have stopped . no movement was visible in him. Seeing that, I also turned my vision inside. As I had acquired dharana siddhi at the tip of the nose, I found it easy to turn my vision inside. When the vision is turned to the drik (subject) inside, the drisya (objects) are not seen. Self was all pervading and perfect (purna). In this state I was sitting for two hours. I came to the conclusion that when the mind was subdued and the objects are not seen, the subject and object are merged in the Self, and that Self is all pervading and perfect. Ganapathi Sastri had come there and I questioned him about this. The sastri replied that the subject and object are different. I couldn't agree with what he said. Bhagavan immediately said that when the mind is subdued there is only one thing, and that the subject and object are not different. I felt very happy on hearing this and concluded with certainty that he was the Guru and that he had realized the truth.

I then told Bhagavan about my eyes and he replied that they would get right after some time and that there was no danger. As it was Kartika Deepam time and, as there was a big crowd of people, Bhagavan said that if I went to see him in the night it would be more convenient. I agreed and went away. When I went there in the night, the doors were closed and all inside were asleep. Thinking it would not be proper to disturb them in their sleep I lied down on the pial outside. As it was the winter season the cold was severe, mosquitoes began to bite and I was unable to sleep. At about three in the morning Bhagavan came outside and saw me. I prostrated. Bhagavan who was all kindness said that I had been put to much trouble and asked me to come inside and sleep by his side. That night I asked him some questions:

Q. What is Nirvikalpa Samadhi?
A. That which has no sankalpam to Nirvikalpa.
Q. In Samadhi, will there not be even the Brahma Bhava?
A. If there is Bhava, it will not be Nirvikalpa.
Q. What is meant by Rama?
A. That in which everything takes its origin, exists and disappears, is Rama.

I then determined that all practices are only means to attain this final stage. I was giving up my former spiritual practices little by little. I felt immensely attracted to Bhagavan and felt quite at home in Ramanasrmam. Bhagavan was all love. After meeting Bhagavan I did not go to any other Guru.

I then read the life of Maharshi. By reading it one acquires vairagyam and dispassion. Just to see him is upadesam; to sit in his presence gives peace. This is my firm belief.

After some time, with Bhagavan's permission, I went back to my native place. I would come twice every year to see him. I heard blessed words from him regarding his experiences.The Swami himself would look after my food arrangements. Just as a father would nuture motherless children, he was always filled with limitless kindness. As I have no strength to walk any distance, I always stay in my cottage or with the Maharshi. And as speech may cause chitta chalanam (thought movement), I observed mounam (silence).

Some time later I came to see Bhagavan again and was in the Asramam for some days. One day I told him about my experience of that time. I told him that at the time of meditation only, the whole thing would appear to be one, and then at other times the subject and object appear to be different, and I asked him how this difference would disappear. He told me that there was still dehavasana, i.e., attachment to the body, and asked me to carry on with my meditation till it disappeared entirely.

I then asked him to tell me how to concentrate. He then said: "When a man dies the funeral pyre is prepared with fuel and the dead body is laid on the pyre. The pyre is lit. First the skin is burnt, then the flesh, and then the bones, until the whole body is converted into ashes. What remains thereafter? Only the spirit. But by Self inquiry the spirit also disappears."

"When this dehavasana goes, ahamkara also vanishes and the Self alone remains."

He had composed "Upadesa Saram" in Tamil. I prayed that he might translate it into Telugu. He rendered it in dwipada (couplets) form in Telugu. I then stayed in the Asramam for some days, went abroad for some time, and then returned to my Asramam. I then gave up everything. When I returned to Tiruvannamalai I would sometimes stay in the Mango Tree Cave near Mulaipal Thirtham.

After Bhagavan had composed "Ulladu Narpadu" in Tamil (.Reality in Forty Verses.), I prayed to him to teach it to me in Telegu. He rendered it into Telegu prose and taught it to me. Reflecting on what he taught me the mind was subdued and dissolved in the Self. Now nothing different from Self is seen.


CB-print-5.jpg

A row of disciples with a well-known saintly person second to the left and quite dark skin: Yogi Ramiah.

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#2 little bird

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 10:41 AM

Really nice to read his experience in his own words. Beautiful photo that first one, too. :pronam: :sparkle:

"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#3 Mahavir_

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 11:13 AM

Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about the depth of Master's love and esteem of him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#4 Mahavir_

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 11:19 AM

Yogi Ramaih, one of the prominent disciples of Shri Ramana Maharshi, came with two other friends. Ramdas felt very happy to see him. His eyes have a light which is perfectly otherworldly, and you feel that he is imbued with the spirit of dispassion. When he sat silent at any place, Ramdas could clearly see that he was conscious of only one existence. This is the attitude of those whose mind is ever in tune with the Eternal. Their look shows that their heart is elsewhere. Ramdas remembers the instance of the hen that sits on its eggs for hatching. If you observe a hen thus occupied, you find a peculiar vacant look in its eyes, as its internal gaze is fixed on eggs. The eyes appear blank, devoid of every kind of expression. Such are the eyes that see and see not. For, they looked into the Infinite and not at the relative world. Yogi Ramaih knew only Telugu; Ramdas could, therefore, communicate with him only by signs. Ramaih attempted to express himself, but his language was a jumble of Telugu and Tamil with a sprinkling of English words. We used to have good laughs on this, in which he also used to join. Ramdas cannot forget the delicious mangoes he brought for him. They were as sweet as he himself.

- Swami Ramdas, In the Vision of God, Vol.II


SIB_02.jpg

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#5 little bird

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 11:21 AM

Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about Master's esteem for him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg


That is exactly what I thought, also, about the second photo. I picked him out of the 'lineup' like you did, though. :)

Such beautiful saints. I have adored Sri Ramana Maharshi for a long time, he has a personal significance for me. He's another saint that seems 'related' somehow to our path, like Sri Ramakrishna. :praying: :sparkle:



:praying:

"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#6 lotusflower

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:48 AM

Here's another picture from Yogi Ramaiah, taken from the book Secret India from Paul Brunton.
Everything in the future will improve if you make the spiritual effort now.

#7 Guest_chris Tobias_guest*

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 10:43 PM

Greetings to all,

I am confused regarding Yogananda meeting Yogi Ramaiah.Ramiah was born 1923 he would have been 12yrs old
when yogananda met him in 1935 I think they has been a mix up some where in either the date Ramaiah was born
or yogananda was talking about sri Munagar s. VenkataRAMAIAH. And Daya Ma may have written letters to

Yogi Ramaiah associated with BABAGI ? Please advise.

#8 Guest_chris Tobias_guest*

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 10:45 PM

Greetings to all,

I am confused regarding Yogananda meeting Yogi Ramaiah.Ramiah was born 1923 he would have been 12yrs old
when yogananda met him in 1935 I think they has been a mix up some where in either the date Ramaiah was born
or yogananda was talking about sri Munagar s. VenkataRAMAIAH. And Daya Ma may have written letters to

Yogi Ramaiah associated with BABAGI ? Please advise.

#9 kaps

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 06:07 AM

Very Nice article!!

On one another occasion master told to Kriyananda - "I met a great saint on my trip to India in 1935," Master said. "He is still alive. His name is Yogi Ramiah. He is a disciple of Ramana Maharshi, and a fully liberated soul. We walked hand in hand around the grounds at Ramanashram, drunk with God. Oh! If I had spent another half hour in his company, I could never have brought myself to leave India again!"

#10 omgurudeva

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 07:40 AM

Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about the depth of Master's love and esteem of him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg


Mahavir,
Thanks for sharing this information on Yogi Ramaiah. One question has always haunted me. Guruji spoke so highly of Yogi Ramaiah saying that he couldn't have left India if he had spent another 30 minutes. Since Yogi Ramaiah was a disciple of Ramana Maharishi -- what I can't understand at all is why did he not say something in the same vein about Sri Ramana. I hope I am not over analyzing. Plain confused. At another place there is a story about Gurudeva mentioning to a disciple that most of the saints he met were Jeevana Mukta's. To be honest I have read a few books on Sri Ramana's teachings and find them immensely uplifting -- so to hear something so respectful about a disciple (Yogi Ramaiah) not the Guru (Sri Ramana) is something I am unable to grasp with my very small and limited intellect.
Thanks

#11 kaps

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 08:35 AM


Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about the depth of Master's love and esteem of him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg


Mahavir,
Thanks for sharing this information on Yogi Ramaiah. One question has always haunted me. Guruji spoke so highly of Yogi Ramaiah saying that he couldn't have left India if he had spent another 30 minutes. Since Yogi Ramaiah was a disciple of Ramana Maharishi -- what I can't understand at all is why did he not say something in the same vein about Sri Ramana. I hope I am not over analyzing. Plain confused. At another place there is a story about Gurudeva mentioning to a disciple that most of the saints he met were Jeevana Mukta's. To be honest I have read a few books on Sri Ramana's teachings and find them immensely uplifting -- so to hear something so respectful about a disciple (Yogi Ramaiah) not the Guru (Sri Ramana) is something I am unable to grasp with my very small and limited intellect.
Thanks


As far I know, Master said he did not include Ramana Maharshi in AOY because Paul Brunton had already written about him in his book "A search in secret India"

#12 little bird

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 10:10 AM


Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about the depth of Master's love and esteem of him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg


Mahavir,
Thanks for sharing this information on Yogi Ramaiah. One question has always haunted me. Guruji spoke so highly of Yogi Ramaiah saying that he couldn't have left India if he had spent another 30 minutes. Since Yogi Ramaiah was a disciple of Ramana Maharishi -- what I can't understand at all is why did he not say something in the same vein about Sri Ramana. I hope I am not over analyzing. Plain confused. At another place there is a story about Gurudeva mentioning to a disciple that most of the saints he met were Jeevana Mukta's. To be honest I have read a few books on Sri Ramana's teachings and find them immensely uplifting -- so to hear something so respectful about a disciple (Yogi Ramaiah) not the Guru (Sri Ramana) is something I am unable to grasp with my very small and limited intellect.
Thanks


Omgurudeva, nice post. I hope you don't mind if I insert my viewpoint here, not sure if it will be helpful, but I know Mahavir will reply, too, when he gets back on the board.

First, that statement was said to come from D. Walters and I tend to take what he says with a large lump of salt. Not that everything he says is wrong, but I believe he is out of tune with Master in many ways (I read some of his writings early on before I even knew about all the scandals and his criticisms of SRF and felt this way personally from the very beginning). So I would not take this statement as fact.

However, it does sound feasible to me that Master could have said something like this. Though sometimes getting a quote just a little wrong or filtered and interpreted from a particular quoter's viewpoint can throw the whole meaning off.

But, taking this quote as is, the way I interpret it, the key to understanding is in where Master said this part (if indeed he did say this):

We walked hand in hand around the grounds at Ramanashram, drunk with God. Oh! If I had spent another half hour in his company, I could never have brought myself to leave India again!"


I think Master and this saint were in the state of nirbikalpa samadhi while walking hand in hand, it's like being in the regular samadhi that we think of when the body appears dead because the soul has temporarily exited, except in nirbikalpa the soul is completely at one with God while at the same time the body is able to function normally. I think Masters are able to go into nirbikalpa at times but don't stay in it indefinitely as a rule (Master entered that state permanently after his great samadhi in 1948. He said he'd always be in that state from then on, but nobody would know). Before this state, as Master explains, one has to have the ability to go into sabikalpa samadhi (in samadhi but the body not functioning) at will.

So what I'm trying to get at is this has nothing to do with Sri RM, the guru, but the state that Master and RMji disciple shared together during that visit. It's hard to be in that great state and then to come out of it again to a somewhat lower state temporarily off and on. I think Master had the spiritual attainment--the 'self Mastery'-- and discrimination to know that he needed to leave to finish his earthly mission for which he was since, but think he was saying it would have been nice just to stay here in this state and not have to go back and do all this mundane spiritual work without the benefit of being in constant nirbikalpa at the point in his mission.

Also, when we read or see pictures of Master walking hand in hand with Rajarsi Janakananda at Encinitas, think this was the state these two were sharing. I don't know this, just has always seemed so to me. Think that Master was giving Rajarsi, a jivanmukta, this state of temporary nirbikalpa. And think this is why Rajarsi so often repeated to Dr. Lewis and others while at Encinitas, "Oh, what Master has done for me."

Just another way to look at this, and may not be exactly right

in divine friendship

"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#13 Mahavir_

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 07:40 PM

Greetings to all,

I am confused regarding Yogananda meeting Yogi Ramaiah.Ramiah was born 1923 he would have been 12yrs old
when yogananda met him in 1935 I think they has been a mix up some where in either the date Ramaiah was born
or yogananda was talking about sri Munagar s. VenkataRAMAIAH. And Daya Ma may have written letters to

Yogi Ramaiah associated with BABAGI ? Please advise.


You are thinking of the wrong Ramaiah. The Ramaiah supposedly associated with Babaji is a claim of Marshall Govindan's. In any case, its not the Yogi Ramiah (later known as Sri Rama Yogi) who is Sri Ramana's disciple.

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#14 Mahavir_

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 07:43 PM

Mahavir,
Thanks for sharing this information on Yogi Ramaiah. One question has always haunted me. Guruji spoke so highly of Yogi Ramaiah saying that he couldn't have left India if he had spent another 30 minutes. Since Yogi Ramaiah was a disciple of Ramana Maharishi -- what I can't understand at all is why did he not say something in the same vein about Sri Ramana. I hope I am not over analyzing. Plain confused. At another place there is a story about Gurudeva mentioning to a disciple that most of the saints he met were Jeevana Mukta's. To be honest I have read a few books on Sri Ramana's teachings and find them immensely uplifting -- so to hear something so respectful about a disciple (Yogi Ramaiah) not the Guru (Sri Ramana) is something I am unable to grasp with my very small and limited intellect.
Thanks


According to Kriyananda, Master told him regarding the Maharshi and Yogi Ramiah that it sometimes happens that a disciple goes further than the guru. Its up to you whether you believe what Kriyananda says here, but that is the reason he gives for why Master was so particularly attracted to the saint. It may well be the case Sri Ramana was not at the apex of his realization at the time of his meeting with Master.

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#15 Mahavir_

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 07:52 PM

First, that statement was said to come from D. Walters and I tend to take what he says with a large lump of salt. Not that everything he says is wrong, but I believe he is out of tune with Master in many ways (I read some of his writings early on before I even knew about all the scandals and his criticisms of SRF and felt this way personally from the very beginning). So I would not take this statement as fact.

However, it does sound feasible to me that Master could have said something like this. Though sometimes getting a quote just a little wrong or filtered and interpreted from a particular quoter's viewpoint can throw the whole meaning off.


The fact Master felt this way is corroborated as well in a letter he sent Rajarsi which is present in the unabridged version of Great Western Yogi published by SRF. In that letter, from memory, he also says he would not have come back to America if he had spent just a while longer in the saint's presence.

I agree with you about the state the two were in having to do with it. If what Kriyananda says is also true, that Master said Yogi Ramiah was more advanced than Maharshi, that makes sense that he might be more attracted by the Yogi than by the Maharshi. Just as its said that although God's love shines equally on all, he is closest to those who attain Him utterly. There could also as easily have been some past life connection.

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#16 omgurudeva

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 08:54 PM


First, that statement was said to come from D. Walters and I tend to take what he says with a large lump of salt. Not that everything he says is wrong, but I believe he is out of tune with Master in many ways (I read some of his writings early on before I even knew about all the scandals and his criticisms of SRF and felt this way personally from the very beginning). So I would not take this statement as fact.

However, it does sound feasible to me that Master could have said something like this. Though sometimes getting a quote just a little wrong or filtered and interpreted from a particular quoter's viewpoint can throw the whole meaning off.


The fact Master felt this way is corroborated as well in a letter he sent Rajarsi which is present in the unabridged version of Great Western Yogi published by SRF. In that letter, from memory, he also says he would not have come back to America if he had spent just a while longer in the saint's presence.

I agree with you about the state the two were in having to do with it. If what Kriyananda says is also true, that Master said Yogi Ramiah was more advanced than Maharshi, that makes sense that he might be more attracted by the Yogi than by the Maharshi. Just as its said that although God's love shines equally on all, he is closest to those who attain Him utterly. There could also as easily have been some past life connection.


Mahavir and Little Bird thanks for your views on this.
So I must admit that I do hold Sri Ramana in the highest regard, sorry to be repetitive perhaps. He seems to be one of those born liberated -- though you know I am a stupid mortal conjecturing the state of saints :). I have just built this up from the evidence of his life. When he passed away it seems a star was located on the Tirvanmalai hill and then when he suddenly awoke to who he was -- in his teenage. Those are signs of an obviously great soul.

If it was Donald Walter's view that Sri Ramana may perhaps have been less advanced, then perhaps there maybe some reasons to double check.
Yes, I have heard Guruji's statement that sometimes the disciple becomes more advanced than the Guru. That I am sure happens once a while not regularly :). In Sri Ramana's case though I must admit it seems quite a stretch given the obvious respect that Guruji met him with and asked him questions for making some fine points about ego and pain in his Autobiography. Also, I have had the good fortune of visiting Ramana Ashram. That place is quite charged! Then, I used to wonder about some points around Guru-disciple relationship that got clear through the words of Sri Ramana in a blaze of "sudden understanding where he spoke of the inner and the outer Guru. In a book by David Godman, Be As you are -- here are precious words of Sri Ramana:

"Sri Ramana often said that God, Guru and the Self are identical; the Guru is God in human form and, simultaneously, he is also the Self in the Heart of each devotee. Because he is both inside and outside, his power works in two different ways. The outer Guru gives instructions and by his power enables the devotee to keep his attention on the Self; the inner Guru pulls the devotee's mind back to its source, absorbs it in the Self and finally destroys it."

For us SRF/YSS devotees the outer Guru came and gave the teachings/techniques, the inner Guru is now pulling and blessing us inward. Its simple and clear in so many ways.

As one devotee "pyislove" beautifully put it on this forum



The Guru has given us the means to be with him in Spirit,<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">in a way that is more real than this world can offer. <br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">If we make the effort we can be with Him and we will have <br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">by our devotion earned that blessing. Nothing is barred to us -<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">it will just be given in a different way - a greater way.


http://forum.yoganan...drance-of-body/

Pardon me, if I appear biased or pedantic. I am really keen to put perspective to Guruji's words on Ramaiah Yogi, who was obviously great in His eyes. Perhaps Guruji stayed silent on Sri Ramana to keep the divine silence on the mission of the great ones. I am asking these out of just spiritual inspiration and understanding Guruji and saints better, if I may.

In this same vein may I ask if Guruji mentioned anything about Swami Vivekananda and Sri Aurobindo? From one devotee I heard that Guruji said Swami Vivekananda was not an avatar -- which to me seemed shocking. Yet, I am so enveloped in the delusion of being mortal that I can hardly grasp these states. Its more out of interest again, as my early steps on the spiritual path took me through the writing of Swami Vivekananda and then I read about this prophecy to Dr Lewis mentioned by Guruji in the AY.
In Divine Friendship

#17 omgurudeva

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 08:56 PM



Yes the photos are wonderful arent they? I had always wanted to see what Yogi Ramaiah looked like ever since reading about the depth of Master's love and esteem of him.

One thing about the second photo above. The official caption says he is the second to the left with dark skin, which i presume means second from the immediate (our) left, but that man doesnt really look like him. Im fairly sure Yogi Ramaiah in that photo is actually the fourth from the left (third from the right).

Here are two other photos with Yogi Ramaiah sitting at Maharshi's feet (our left) with a lot of the disciples.


arch-34_7.jpg

arch-35_5.jpg


Mahavir,
Thanks for sharing this information on Yogi Ramaiah. One question has always haunted me. Guruji spoke so highly of Yogi Ramaiah saying that he couldn't have left India if he had spent another 30 minutes. Since Yogi Ramaiah was a disciple of Ramana Maharishi -- what I can't understand at all is why did he not say something in the same vein about Sri Ramana. I hope I am not over analyzing. Plain confused. At another place there is a story about Gurudeva mentioning to a disciple that most of the saints he met were Jeevana Mukta's. To be honest I have read a few books on Sri Ramana's teachings and find them immensely uplifting -- so to hear something so respectful about a disciple (Yogi Ramaiah) not the Guru (Sri Ramana) is something I am unable to grasp with my very small and limited intellect.
Thanks


As far I know, Master said he did not include Ramana Maharshi in AOY because Paul Brunton had already written about him in his book "A search in secret India"


Kaps who did Master say this to please? Keen to understand here. IDF

#18 little bird

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 09:07 PM


First, that statement was said to come from D. Walters and I tend to take what he says with a large lump of salt. Not that everything he says is wrong, but I believe he is out of tune with Master in many ways (I read some of his writings early on before I even knew about all the scandals and his criticisms of SRF and felt this way personally from the very beginning). So I would not take this statement as fact.

However, it does sound feasible to me that Master could have said something like this. Though sometimes getting a quote just a little wrong or filtered and interpreted from a particular quoter's viewpoint can throw the whole meaning off.


The fact Master felt this way is corroborated as well in a letter he sent Rajarsi which is present in the unabridged version of Great Western Yogi published by SRF. In that letter, from memory, he also says he would not have come back to America if he had spent just a while longer in the saint's presence.

I agree with you about the state the two were in having to do with it. If what Kriyananda says is also true, that Master said Yogi Ramiah was more advanced than Maharshi, that makes sense that he might be more attracted by the Yogi than by the Maharshi. Just as its said that although God's love shines equally on all, he is closest to those who attain Him utterly. There could also as easily have been some past life connection.


It would be interesting to read exactly what Master said to Rajarsi in that letter. Anything else I don't see need to give credence to personally, that kind of information is too important to believe from a questionable source, imo.

I still don't think that Master's experience with this saint had to be due to the saint being greater than anyone else and don't think he was responsible for Master's state of consciousness at that time necessarily. Everything Master did was for a purpose, in accordance with his mission, imo. When he visited different saints he had different kinds of interactions with each one, not for his own benefit but for what it would teach us. From what I've read about Master's visit with Sri RM, rather than walking around in bliss, his purpose was to ask him some questions--not for his benefit, but for ours to hear the answers. I believe that may have been where Sister Gyanamata got her references to things that RM said that were included in her book God Alone, also, rather than her reading those things elsewhere, but not entirely sure about that. Come to think of it, I don't think Sister G. would be quoting those particular things from Sri RMji in that book unless he was held in the highest esteem.

Master said something interesting to Rajarsi that might be relevant to this topic, also in Rajarsi's memorial book (p. 72 in 5th edition). Writing from Inida he tells Rajarsi that Rajarsi's life would be happier not in travels, but in meditation in retirement. And Master says he would prefer to stay in one place himself, but his life is meant also for travels to America and from there to other places because his students from former incarnations could not come to him there in India.

Remember that Master originally wanted to either live his life as a wandering sadhu on the banks of the Ganges, or in the Himalayas, so he could just commune with God all the time, a Divine Gypsy, but Sri Yji showed him he was meant to give his life in work for others. (this is in AY) I am guessing that because he had a chance to walk around with that saint and go higher in that nirbikalpa state during that particular visit, it brought back that original longing he had always had just to stay in one place in India and do nothing but commune with God all the time.

Well, that is my opinion and I'm sticking to it...unless otherwise convinced. :D :love: :chtree:

"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#19 omgurudeva

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 09:31 PM



First, that statement was said to come from D. Walters and I tend to take what he says with a large lump of salt. Not that everything he says is wrong, but I believe he is out of tune with Master in many ways (I read some of his writings early on before I even knew about all the scandals and his criticisms of SRF and felt this way personally from the very beginning). So I would not take this statement as fact.

However, it does sound feasible to me that Master could have said something like this. Though sometimes getting a quote just a little wrong or filtered and interpreted from a particular quoter's viewpoint can throw the whole meaning off.


The fact Master felt this way is corroborated as well in a letter he sent Rajarsi which is present in the unabridged version of Great Western Yogi published by SRF. In that letter, from memory, he also says he would not have come back to America if he had spent just a while longer in the saint's presence.

I agree with you about the state the two were in having to do with it. If what Kriyananda says is also true, that Master said Yogi Ramiah was more advanced than Maharshi, that makes sense that he might be more attracted by the Yogi than by the Maharshi. Just as its said that although God's love shines equally on all, he is closest to those who attain Him utterly. There could also as easily have been some past life connection.


It would be interesting to read exactly what Master said to Rajarsi in that letter. Anything else I don't see need to give credence to personally, that kind of information is too important to believe from a questionable source, imo.

I still don't think that Master's experience with this saint had to be due to the saint being greater than anyone else and don't think he was responsible for Master's state of consciousness at that time necessarily. Everything Master did was for a purpose, in accordance with his mission, imo. When he visited different saints he had different kinds of interactions with each one, not for his own benefit but for what it would teach us. From what I've read about Master's visit with Sri RM, rather than walking around in bliss, his purpose was to ask him some questions--not for his benefit, but for ours to hear the answers. I believe that may have been where Sister Gyanamata got her references to things that RM said that were included in her book God Alone, also, rather than her reading those things elsewhere, but not entirely sure about that. Come to think of it, I don't think Sister G. would be quoting those particular things from Sri RMji in that book unless he was held in the highest esteem.

Master said something interesting to Rajarsi that might be relevant to this topic, also in Rajarsi's memorial book (p. 72 in 5th edition). Writing from Inida he tells Rajarsi that Rajarsi's life would be happier not in travels, but in meditation in retirement. And Master says he would prefer to stay in one place himself, but his life is meant also for travels to America and from there to other places because his students from former incarnations could not come to him there in India.

Remember that Master originally wanted to either live his life as a wandering sadhu on the banks of the Ganges, or in the Himalayas, so he could just commune with God all the time, a Divine Gypsy, but Sri Yji showed him he was meant to give his life in work for others. (this is in AY) I am guessing that because he had a chance to walk around with that saint and go higher in that nirbikalpa state during that particular visit, it brought back that original longing he had always had just to stay in one place in India and do nothing but commune with God all the time.

Well, that is my opinion and I'm sticking to it...unless otherwise convinced. :D :love: :chtree:



Thanks Little Bird your answer is very satisfying to my basic sense of logic and a fair interpretation. Well said this does make sense now". Very helpful indeed.


""I still don't think that Master's experience with this saint had to be due to the saint being greater than anyone else and don't think he was responsible for Master's state of consciousness at that time necessarily. Everything Master did was for a purpose, in accordance with his mission, imo. When he visited different saints he had different kinds of interactions with each one, not for his own benefit but for what it would teach us. From what I've read about Master's visit with Sri RM, rather than walking around in bliss, his purpose was to ask him some questions--not for his benefit, but for ours to hear the answers.




Remember that Master originally wanted to either live his life as a wandering sadhu on the banks of the Ganges, or in the Himalayas, so he could just commune with God all the time, a Divine Gypsy, but Sri Yji showed him he was meant to give his life in work for others. (this is in AY) I am guessing that because he had a chance to walk around with that saint and go higher in that nirbikalpa state during that particular visit, it brought back that original longing he had always had just to stay in one place in India and do nothing but commune with God all the time.""

Btw I dont have God Alone handy. When I read it first I never noticed Sri Ramana's quotes. Could you possibly mention what Sister Gyanamata quotes of Sri Ramana, if its not too inconvenient?

I don't think Sister G. would be quoting those particular things from Sri RMji in that book unless he was held in the highest esteem."

Jai Guru!

#20 SaintMirabai

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 11:21 PM

Thanks for the information and photos, very good.

Aum, all our Gurus & their friends :meditate:

#21 Mahavir_

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 01:47 AM

Mahavir and Little Bird thanks for your views on this.
So I must admit that I do hold Sri Ramana in the highest regard, sorry to be repetitive perhaps. He seems to be one of those born liberated -- though you know I am a stupid mortal conjecturing the state of saints :). I have just built this up from the evidence of his life. When he passed away it seems a star was located on the Tirvanmalai hill and then when he suddenly awoke to who he was -- in his teenage. Those are signs of an obviously great soul.

If it was Donald Walter's view that Sri Ramana may perhaps have been less advanced, then perhaps there maybe some reasons to double check.
Yes, I have heard Guruji's statement that sometimes the disciple becomes more advanced than the Guru. That I am sure happens once a while not regularly :). In Sri Ramana's case though I must admit it seems quite a stretch given the obvious respect that Guruji met him with and asked him questions for making some fine points about ego and pain in his Autobiography. Also, I have had the good fortune of visiting Ramana Ashram. That place is quite charged! Then, I used to wonder about some points around Guru-disciple relationship that got clear through the words of Sri Ramana in a blaze of "sudden understanding where he spoke of the inner and the outer Guru. In a book by David Godman, Be As you are -- here are precious words of Sri Ramana:

"Sri Ramana often said that God, Guru and the Self are identical; the Guru is God in human form and, simultaneously, he is also the Self in the Heart of each devotee. Because he is both inside and outside, his power works in two different ways. The outer Guru gives instructions and by his power enables the devotee to keep his attention on the Self; the inner Guru pulls the devotee's mind back to its source, absorbs it in the Self and finally destroys it."

For us SRF/YSS devotees the outer Guru came and gave the teachings/techniques, the inner Guru is now pulling and blessing us inward. Its simple and clear in so many ways.

As one devotee "pyislove" beautifully put it on this forum



The Guru has given us the means to be with him in Spirit,<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">in a way that is more real than this world can offer. <br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">If we make the effort we can be with Him and we will have <br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">by our devotion earned that blessing. Nothing is barred to us -<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; line-height: 19px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">it will just be given in a different way - a greater way.


http://forum.yoganan...drance-of-body/

Pardon me, if I appear biased or pedantic. I am really keen to put perspective to Guruji's words on Ramaiah Yogi, who was obviously great in His eyes. Perhaps Guruji stayed silent on Sri Ramana to keep the divine silence on the mission of the great ones. I am asking these out of just spiritual inspiration and understanding Guruji and saints better, if I may.

In this same vein may I ask if Guruji mentioned anything about Swami Vivekananda and Sri Aurobindo? From one devotee I heard that Guruji said Swami Vivekananda was not an avatar -- which to me seemed shocking. Yet, I am so enveloped in the delusion of being mortal that I can hardly grasp these states. Its more out of interest again, as my early steps on the spiritual path took me through the writing of Swami Vivekananda and then I read about this prophecy to Dr Lewis mentioned by Guruji in the AY.
In Divine Friendship


Well yes it was Kriyananda who said it, so for most there is always a reason to question any given thing he says. He occasionally seems to me to say a little too much about something the Guru may have told him, things which SRF monastics would not say, and in the case of stating that Master told him Yogi Ramiah was more advanced that Sri Ramana we have a fine example of this. On the other hand it is not necessarily untrue that Guruji really did say it. So it remains in the realm of possibility.

The holding of Sri Ramana in highest esteem doesnt really have much to do with the hair-splitting of what particular spiritual state he had attained, and if he had gone all the way or not at the time of the meeting with Master.

Re: Vivekananda not being an avatar and that it was Master who said so, i have not heard that anywhere. I only know that it was Sri Aurobindo who had written in a letter that he considered Vivekananda to be a vibhuti or manifestation of the Divine, albeit a great one, but not an avatar. Then again Sri Ramakrishna considered Veivekananda to be a born nityasiddha or eternally free soul, so by Master's definition of an avatar he would most likely have qualified as one, though probably a partial manifestation and not a full one. Maybe this is what Sri Aurobindo meant by referring to him as a vibhuti in the first place. On Sri Aurobindo, ive never read or heard about anything Master had said about him.

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya


#22 Guest_Guest_guest*

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 03:47 AM

Master in his life time met so many souls who were fully or almost liberated. Do we have any liberated souls in present time? There are many who claim so.
Also within SRF, Master spoke highly of Rajarsi,Gyanmata,Durga Mata in his handwritten letters as well as in talks. But I have not heard from master about any present living souls.Rajarsi and Gyanmata were liberated per master and he wrote in his letter to Durga Mata that she will share space next to Gyanmata in heaven, so she must have been liberated too. Somewhere I read that master used to say that his 3 most disciples in order are Rajarsi, Mr Oliver Black
and then GyanMata. What about other disciples?

#23 kaps

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 03:47 AM

Master in his life time met so many souls who were fully or almost liberated. Do we have any liberated souls in present time? There are many who claim so.
Also within SRF, Master spoke highly of Rajarsi,Gyanmata,Durga Mata in his handwritten letters as well as in talks. But I have not heard from master about any present living souls.Rajarsi and Gyanmata were liberated per master and he wrote in his letter to Durga Mata that she will share space next to Gyanmata in heaven, so she must have been liberated too. Somewhere I read that master used to say that his 3 most disciples in order are Rajarsi, Mr Oliver Black and then GyanMata. What about other disciples?

#24 Gurucharan

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 07:25 AM

We often get into the discussion which Yogi was 'truly' liberated, which one was greater in attainment and so on..,

Is it really required or how many of us think we are competent to continuously discuss such issues?

Just wondering Posted Image

IDF

Sundar

#25 kaps

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:18 AM

True GuruCharan, that we are not competent to rate any saint. But we can always refer to what master or other great saints said about them.
eg Master spoke so highly of Rajarsi.Gyanmata, Durga Mata, Yogi Ramaiah...so now whenever I read anything that they have written I dont have to think twice about it's credibility and don't have to apply my logic. :)

IDF-Kaps


We often get into the discussion which Yogi was 'truly' liberated, which one was greater in attainment and so on..,

Is it really required or how many of us think we are competent to continuously discuss such issues?

Just wondering Posted Image

IDF

Sundar



#26 little bird

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 11:52 AM

Master in his life time met so many souls who were fully or almost liberated. Do we have any liberated souls in present time? There are many who claim so.
Also within SRF, Master spoke highly of Rajarsi,Gyanmata,Durga Mata in his handwritten letters as well as in talks. But I have not heard from master about any present living souls.Rajarsi and Gyanmata were liberated per master and he wrote in his letter to Durga Mata that she will share space next to Gyanmata in heaven, so she must have been liberated too. Somewhere I read that master used to say that his 3 most disciples in order are Rajarsi, Mr Oliver Black and then GyanMata. What about other disciples?


I've never heard that about Oliver Black.

Are you aware that Master said (in several places) that avatars always bring great souls to incarnate with them to help in the avatar's mission?

I believe that Master singled out those specific disciples to comment on because they had attained higher stature already while with Master. The others were mostly much younger at that time. But I think it is like what Master said about Christ's disciples, they all attained liberation in that incarnation (except Judas, of course), (but not all at once, as I understand, the disciples lived much longer than did Jesus and continued to develop further spiritually).

With SRF/YSS Babaji also said that there would always be persons of realization at the head of the organization (and I don't think he meant only the president). How could there not be, it seems to me, otherwise this great work could not become what Babaji meant for it to be for the whole dwapara yuga, in particular, in my view.

This is why I believe that Daya Ma (and her successors) in particular fall in this category. My personal intuition tells me there have been and are a number of other SRF and YSS liberated souls, based on knowledge of their lives, and in some cases listening to them speak and things said about them by other monastics, and in the case of Daya Ma especially one particular direct personal experience. But I don't expect others to believe in my personal experience or intuition.

"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#27 little bird

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:22 PM

Mahavir and Little Bird thanks for your views on this.
So I must admit that I do hold Sri Ramana in the highest regard, sorry to be repetitive perhaps. He seems to be one of those born liberated -- though you know I am a stupid mortal conjecturing the state of saints :). I have just built this up from the evidence of his life. When he passed away it seems a star was located on the Tirvanmalai hill and then when he suddenly awoke to who he was -- in his teenage. Those are signs of an obviously great soul.

If it was Donald Walter's view that Sri Ramana may perhaps have been less advanced, then perhaps there maybe some reasons to double check.
Yes, I have heard Guruji's statement that sometimes the disciple becomes more advanced than the Guru. That I am sure happens once a while not regularly :). In Sri Ramana's case though I must admit it seems quite a stretch given the obvious respect that Guruji met him with and asked him questions for making some fine points about ego and pain in his Autobiography. Also, I have had the good fortune of visiting Ramana Ashram. That place is quite charged! Then, I used to wonder about some points around Guru-disciple relationship that got clear through the words of Sri Ramana in a blaze of "sudden understanding where he spoke of the inner and the outer Guru. In a book by David Godman, Be As you are -- here are precious words of Sri Ramana:

In Sri Ramana's case though I must admit it seems quite a stretch given the obvious respect that Guruji met him with and asked him questions for making some fine points about ego and pain in his Autobiography. Also, I have had the good fortune of visiting Ramana Ashram. That place is quite charged! Then, I used to wonder about some points around Guru-disciple relationship that got clear through the words of Sri Ramana in a blaze of "sudden understanding where he spoke of the inner and the outer Guru. In a book by David Godman, Be As you are -- here are precious words of Sri Ramana:




Dear Omgurudeva, (love your username, btw)

This thread is the first time I have heard Sri RM's spiritual stature even questioned. I have had the same kind of experience with Sri RM as you said above myself. One of those 'big questions' that I've been trying to get an answer to for some time because of its significance for my personal sadhana, one of the greatest parts of the answer came from him. Then I looked up the word he used in the index of GTWA and there I found the idea in Master's teaching. RM had explained it more fully actually, but I needed to hear it from Master, too, and Master gave another aspect to it, also.

I have always believed and felt that RM was of the highest caliber. For one reason, in AY the way Master wrote about him, very simply but to me very profound.

Swami Vivekananda explained once why the photos of saints aren't like photos of ordinary people. These greatest saints always put themselves (or are already in) a higher state of consciousness when they have the photo taken, so there is no 'ego' in the photo, only that consciousness. Makes so much sense to me as we feel that higher vibration, 'darshan.' To me it is always most evident in their eyes.


gse_multipart61735.jpg


In your other reply to me you asked about Sister Gyanamata quoting him.

God Alone
, Sister Gyanamata

Chapter, "Suffering Can Be A Pathway To Greatness"

[writing to Master]

When you visited Ramana Maharshi in South India, in order to draw him out you put to him several questions, one of which was, "Why so much suffering?" He replied by asking, "What suffers?" It is the self, the ego. If it did not suffer, would it not grow very strong and powerful? And if I do not die to self, how can I live in God?


How simply he answered, just two words and that not an answer but another question. And yet how profoundly the answer is understood. :meditate: (These two words have helped me hundreds of times over the years whenever there is 'suffering' of any kind, physical, mental, spiritual, if I can just remember to ask that simple question, and dear Sister G's answer. (ouch!) Oh, it's only a little more ego dying! That's good! (ouch! ouch!) :))


in divine friendship


"May Thy Love shine forever on the sanctuary of our devotion, and may we be able to awaken Thy Love in all hearts."

"Only Love can take my place." Master

"Love one another." Christ


#28 Gurucharan

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 10:27 PM

Dear Mahavir,

First of all, I would like to thank you so much for starting this wonderful thread on a great Yogi - lesser known and discussed and bringing out his writing on to these Boards. The key thoughts I took out of his own writing are:

1) Importance of practising the presence of God (Japa Yoga). It has practically carried him all the way through. When I read through his efforts - I was reminded of Peace Pilgrim (after sometime the Japa is more or less automatic)

2) Importance of Raja Yoga such as Pranayama -----to------Dharana

3) Importance of a True Guru - he had two Masters helping him - how wonderfully they helped him to reach his goal

4) Importance of balance between activity and meditation: The Guru nicely nudged him from a path of an aspiration for 'all meditation' to that of a balanced life - between meditation and activity.

5) I did not fail to notice the trigger that Kabir's life had on him! Probably there is a connection in the previous lives between Gurudeva and Him - like lb points out. Else Kabir's life could not have had such a profound effect.

What a wonderful life he lived!

Thanks once again.Posted Image

IDF

Sundar

#29 SaintMirabai

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 01:19 AM

Dear Mahavir,

First of all, I would like to thank you so much for starting this wonderful thread on a great Yogi - lesser known and discussed and bringing out his writing on to these Boards. The key thoughts I took out of his own writing are:

1) Importance of practising the presence of God (Japa Yoga). It has practically carried him all the way through. When I read through his efforts - I was reminded of Peace Pilgrim (after sometime the Japa is more or less automatic)

2) Importance of Raja Yoga such as Pranayama -----to------Dharana

3) Importance of a True Guru - he had two Masters helping him - how wonderfully they helped him to reach his goal

4) Importance of balance between activity and meditation: The Guru nicely nudged him from a path of an aspiration for 'all meditation' to that of a balanced life - between meditation and activity.

5) I did not fail to notice the trigger that Kabir's life had on him! Probably there is a connection in the previous lives between Gurudeva and Him - like lb points out. Else Kabir's life could not have had such a profound effect.

What a wonderful life he lived!

Thanks once again.Posted Image

IDF

Sundar


Agree with Gurucharan, most interesting post, thanks Mahavir :reading:

#30 Mahavir_

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 11:38 PM

Dear Mahavir,

First of all, I would like to thank you so much for starting this wonderful thread on a great Yogi - lesser known and discussed and bringing out his writing on to these Boards. The key thoughts I took out of his own writing are:

1) Importance of practising the presence of God (Japa Yoga). It has practically carried him all the way through. When I read through his efforts - I was reminded of Peace Pilgrim (after sometime the Japa is more or less automatic)

2) Importance of Raja Yoga such as Pranayama -----to------Dharana

3) Importance of a True Guru - he had two Masters helping him - how wonderfully they helped him to reach his goal

4) Importance of balance between activity and meditation: The Guru nicely nudged him from a path of an aspiration for 'all meditation' to that of a balanced life - between meditation and activity.

5) I did not fail to notice the trigger that Kabir's life had on him! Probably there is a connection in the previous lives between Gurudeva and Him - like lb points out. Else Kabir's life could not have had such a profound effect.

What a wonderful life he lived!

Thanks once again.Posted Image

IDF

Sundar


Thanks Sundar, he was a great soul indeed. I love particularly how he expressed devotion for the Personal aspect of God in his sadhana, and how he combined it perfectly with Sri Ramana's jnani approach. That is perhaps another reason Guruji loved him so (Master having done the same under Sriyukteswarji's guidance).

idf

'One who practices pranayama, truly loves all beings.'  ~  Lahiri Mahasaya




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